When the private sector does not address a major issue, the public sector will often step into the vacuum and do it. The construction industry has been slow to embrace the principles of social responsibility and sustainable value, focusing instead on whatever it takes to be lowest bidder. As a consequence of this, government is adopting policies that reshape the rules for the industry.

Hundreds marched through downtown Austin in Febuary to honor the men and women who have died in the Texas construction industry. The event was organized by Workers Defense Project and drew statewide support.

“It is heartbreaking that Texas remains the deadliest state in the country to work in construction. Workers Defense will keep organizing, marching, and taking action until our elected officials stand with the working families they represent,” said Cristina Tzintzún, Executive Director of Workers Defense Project.

“We are here today because the hands that build Texas in this deadly industry also feed families. It doesn’t have to be this way -- the Texas construction industry can be safe. But our elected officials must take action,” said Tzintzún.    Read more » about Hundreds March In Honor Of Fallen Workers

State funding for college campus construction projects has been described by many around Texas as “long overdue.”  Leaders in the Texas legislature have agreed on the fundamentals in recent years but have been unable to come to a consensus on the details of a solution.

This year, various construction associations, educators, and others are pushing lawmakers to approve as much as $3.6 billion in new buildings at multiple college campuses.  Leaders in higher education say public universities are quickly falling behind in classroom space and other facilities as they struggle to accommodate growing demand.  In many cases, the buildings on college campuses are decades out of date.   Read more » about Higher Education Chairman Optimistic About Campus Construction Funding

The Chairman of the Board of the Associated General Contractors Austin Chapter, John Cyrier, will be sworn in soon as a State Representative in the Texas House. That’s after narrowly winning a special runoff election on Tuesday.

Per the AGC Texas Building Branch:

“With wins in three out of the district's five counties for a total of 52 percent of the nearly 8,000 votes, Cyrier (R-Caldwell) defeated Brent Golemon (R-Bastrop) to take the seat vacated by Rep. Tim Kleinschmidt (R-Lexington). Cyrier, the AGC Austin Chapter chair, won with 329 votes to spare after leading with 46 percent of the vote in last month's five-way special election.”

Cyrier, a Republican, served as Caldwell County Commissioner and County Judge Pro-Tem until 2013. As Commissioner, he worked closely with neighboring county governments throughout House District 17 and led emergency and recovery efforts for the devastating 2011 wildfires in Caldwell and Bastrop Counties.   Read more » about Construction Leader Wins Seat in Texas House

One major roadblock to creating a sustainable workforce in the Texas construction industry is rampant wage theft by unethical businesses in our state. Many of them are the very same companies that routinely misclassify their workers. 

As Construction Citizen has reported over the years, the refusal to pay people who do some of the hardest labor is not only commonplace, but in some cases has included alleged threats of violence. In one situation in Houston, for example, an employer was accused of threatening a worker at gunpoint when he simply asked to receive his paycheck. No one should have to go through that as they work honestly to support their family. Wage theft happens to workers who are both undocumented and documented, it should be noted.    Read more » about Bipartisan Push to Crack Down on Wage Theft in Texas

I love the construction industry and I speak from experience when telling you it has to be saved from itself. Since 1938, our family business has helped build the monuments of this city and this state. More importantly, our companies – like many others over the past 75 years – have helped tens of thousands of hard-working Americans enjoy an honorable blue collar, middle class standard of living. But, now our middle class is threatened like never before.

When I graduated from Texas A&M in 1969, after serving my active duty in the Marine Corps Reserves, I joined the local carpenters union as a drywall mechanic. Wages and benefits were very good and it was indeed a quality, middle class occupation. The non-union tradespeople enjoyed the same kind of lifestyle. We all received good hourly pay, overtime, worker’s compensation insurance protection and had employment taxes deducted and paid. There was a bond between company and worker.    Read more » about How the Construction Industry Can Help Save the American Middle Class

Earlier this month, President Barack Obama announced that he was going to propose a plan to Congress which would make “the first two years of community college free for everybody who is willing to work for it.”  He stated the importance of education not just for kids, but also to offer the opportunity for everybody to become better trained so that they could receive better jobs, wages, and benefits.  During his annual State of the Union Address on January 20, he explained why he believes this plan is so important.  He said,

“To make sure folks keep earning higher wages down the road, we have to do more to help Americans upgrade their skills.

“America thrived in the 20th century because we made high school free, sent a generation of GIs to college, and trained the best workforce in the world.  But in a 21st century economy that rewards knowledge like never before, we need to do more.   Read more » about Can Free Community College Close the Skills Gap?

A report from a bipartisan panel of Texas lawmakers says companies that pretend their employees are independent subcontractors are undermining free markets and encouraging illegal immigration, among other serious problems. The practice of worker misclassification, as Construction Citizen has reported many times, happens when an employer intentionally skirts the law by paying workers as independent subcontractors when they meet the legal definition of employees and should be paid as such.

Preventing workers from being paid as employees denies them basic protections and costs taxpayers millions each year because employers are avoiding payroll taxes on that labor. Employers who follow the law are investing in a sustainable workforce, which is undermined by worker misclassification. Many of those ethical employers have urged lawmakers to do more to contain what they’ve called “a cancer” in the heart of the construction industry.

So, the Texas House Business and Industry Committee this past year took an in-depth look at the issue, including testimony from construction industry leaders, labor advocates and others who are united in combating misclassification. Read more » about Texas House Panel finds that worker misclassification “compromises free markets” and promotes “lawlessness”

A key political leader in Texas is set to propose a plan to build on sweeping education reforms passed in the state two years ago. House Speaker Joe Straus this week announced he will propose additional resources for counseling of students. This comes after some lawmakers questioned whether the state is doing enough to make sure students and their parents are equipped to take full advantage of changes made under House Bill 5, which created multiple pathways to a high school diploma.

Specifically, Speaker Straus will ask lawmakers to approve stipends for counselors designed to entice those educators to pursue additional training in their field. Doing so would enable them to better serve students who now have to navigate the more complicated system of multiple pathways to graduation.    Read more » about Texas House to Build on Education Reforms